trademark

[treyd-mahrk]
noun
1.
any name, symbol, figure, letter, word, or mark adopted and used by a manufacturer or merchant in order to designate his or her goods and to distinguish them from those manufactured or sold by others. A trademark is a proprietary term that is usually registered with the Patent and Trademark Office to assure its exclusive use by its owner.
2.
a distinctive mark or feature particularly characteristic of or identified with a person or thing.
verb (used with object)
3.
to stamp or otherwise place a trademark designation upon.
4.
to register the trademark of.

Origin:
1565–75; trade + mark1

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
trademark (ˈtreɪdˌmɑːk)
 
n
1.  the name or other symbol used to identify the goods produced by a particular manufacturer or distributed by a particular dealer and to distinguish them from products associated with competing manufacturers or dealers. A trademark that has been officially registered and is therefore legally protected is known as a Registered Trademark
2.  any distinctive sign or mark of the presence of a person or animal
 
vb
3.  to label with a trademark
4.  to register as a trademark

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
The ice age that created the countries' trademark fjords would not occur until
  millions of years later.
At stake are multimillion-dollar budgets that depend on trademark rights to
  raise revenue for the challenge campaigns.
Trademark holders want to be able to defend their brands online.
Trademark laws protect the trademarked names from being used by anyone other
  than the registered company.
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