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transfinite number

noun, Mathematics
1.
an infinite cardinal or ordinal number.
Origin
1900-1905
1900-05
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for transfinite-number

transfinite number

noun
1.
a cardinal or ordinal number used in the comparison of infinite sets for which several types of infinity can be classified: the set of integers and the set of real numbers have different transfinite numbers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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transfinite-number in Science
transfinite number
  (trāns-fī'nīt')   
A number that is greater than any finite number.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for transfinite-number

transfinite number

denotation of the size of an infinite collection of objects. Comparison of certain infinite collections suggests that they have different sizes even though they are all infinite. For example, the sets of integers, rational numbers, and real numbers are all infinite; but each is a subset of the next. Ordering the size of sets according to the subset relation results in too many classifications and gives no way of comparing the size of sets involving different elements. Sets of different elements can be compared by pairing them off and seeing which set has leftover elements. If the fractions are listed in a special way, they can be paired off with the integers with no numbers left over from either set. Any infinite set that can be thus paired off with the integers is called countably, or denumerably, infinite. It has been demonstrated that the real numbers cannot be paired off in this way; and so they are called uncountable or nondenumerable and are considered as larger sets. There are still larger sets, such as the set of all functions involving real numbers. The size of infinite sets is indicated by the cardinal numbers symbolized by the Hebrew letter aleph (alef>) with subscript. Aleph-null symbolizes the cardinality of any set that can be matched with the integers. The cardinality of the real numbers, or the continuum, is c. The continuum hypothesis asserts that c equals aleph-one, the next cardinal number; that is, no sets exist with cardinality between aleph-null and aleph-one. The set of all subsets of a given set has a larger cardinal number than the set itself, resulting in an infinite succession of cardinal numbers of increasing size

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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