transitory

[tran-si-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee, -zi-]
adjective
1.
not lasting, enduring, permanent, or eternal.
2.
lasting only a short time; brief; short-lived; temporary.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English transitorie < Late Latin trānsitōrius fleeting (see transit, -tory1); replacing Middle English transitoire < Middle French < Late Latin, as above

transitorily [tran-si-tawr-uh-lee, -tohr-, tran-si-tawr-, -tohr-, -zi-] , adverb
transitoriness, noun
untransitorily, adverb
untransitoriness, noun
untransitory, adjective


2. See temporary.


2. permanent.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
transitory (ˈtrænsɪtərɪ, -trɪ)
 
adj
of short duration; transient or ephemeral
 
[C14: from Church Latin transitōrius passing, from Latin transitus a crossing over; see transient]
 
'transitorily
 
adv
 
'transitoriness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

transitory
late 14c., from O.Fr. transitoire (12c.), from L.L. transitorius "passing, transient," from L., "allowing passage through," from transitus, pp. of transire "go or cross over" (see transient).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Two-legged walking in a chimp is an occasional, transitory behavior.
Most unfortunate, however, are buildings designed in immediate response to
  transitory events.
Unlike any single piece of print journalism, its borders are extremely porous
  and its truth inherently transitory.
Senate opposition to this treaty or to some similar agreement is probably
  transitory.
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