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treat

[treet] /trit/
verb (used with object)
1.
to act or behave toward (a person) in some specified way:
to treat someone with respect.
2.
to consider or regard in a specified way, and deal with accordingly:
to treat a matter as unimportant.
3.
to deal with (a disease, patient, etc.) in order to relieve or cure.
4.
to deal with in speech or writing; discuss.
5.
to deal with, develop, or represent artistically, especially in some specified manner or style:
to treat a theme realistically.
6.
to subject to some agent or action in order to bring about a particular result:
to treat a substance with an acid.
7.
to entertain; give hospitality to:
He treats diplomats in the lavish surroundings of his country estate.
8.
to provide food, entertainment, gifts, etc., at one's own expense:
Let me treat you to dinner.
verb (used without object)
9.
to deal with a subject in speech or writing; discourse:
a work that treats of the caste system in India.
10.
to give, or bear the expense of, a treat:
Is it my turn to treat?
11.
to carry on negotiations with a view to a settlement; discuss terms of settlement; negotiate.
noun
12.
entertainment, food, drink, etc., given by way of compliment or as an expression of friendly regard.
13.
anything that affords particular pleasure or enjoyment.
14.
the act of treating.
15.
one's turn to treat.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English treten (v.) < Old French tretier, traitier < Latin tractāre to drag, handle, treat, frequentative of trahere to drag. See tract1
Related forms
treater, noun
nontreated, adjective
overtreat, verb
self-treated, adjective
untreated, adjective
well-treated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for treat
  • Then treat the interim appointee with utmost respect and courteous regard.
  • Many different medications are used to treat migraines.
  • Your colleagues, mostly older than you, treat you as a whelp instead of as someone who's au courant.
  • Gliomas are particularly difficult to treat with conventional therapies.
  • Broad anecdotal evidence suggests acupuncture can effectively treat a host of ailments in animals.
  • Also, the symptoms are not long enough to treat with medication.
  • Uncover the bittersweet story of this ancient treat.
  • And there's no denying that it can sometimes be useful to treat the syllabus as a meaningful resource for the whole semester.
  • Many animals seem able to treat their illnesses themselves.
  • Isn't it amazing how many people think drug therapy will treat drug addiction.
British Dictionary definitions for treat

treat

/triːt/
noun
1.
a celebration, entertainment, gift, or feast given for or to someone and paid for by another
2.
any delightful surprise or specially pleasant occasion
3.
the act of treating
verb
4.
(transitive) to deal with or regard in a certain manner she treats school as a joke
5.
(transitive) to apply treatment to to treat a patient for malaria
6.
(transitive) to subject to a process or to the application of a substance to treat photographic film with developer
7.
(transitive; often foll by to) to provide (someone) (with) as a treat he treated the children to a trip to the zoo
8.
(formal) (intransitive) usually foll by of. to deal (with), as in writing or speaking
9.
(intransitive) (formal) to discuss settlement; negotiate
Derived Forms
treatable, adjective
treater, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French tretier, from Latin tractāre to manage, from trahere to drag
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for treat
treat
c.1300, "negotiate, bargain, deal with," from O.Fr. traitier (12c.), from L. tractare "manage, handle, deal with," originally "drag about," frequentative of trahere (pp. tractus) "to pull, draw" (see tract (1)). Meaning "to entertain with food and drink by way of compliment or kindness (or bribery)" is recorded from c.1500. Sense of "deal with in speech or writing" (early 14c.) led to the use in medicine (1781), "to attempt to heal or cure." The noun is first recorded late 14c., "action of discussing terms;" sense of "a treating with food and drink" (1650s) was extended by 1770 to "anything that gives pleasure." Treatment "conduct, behavior" is recorded from c.1560; in the medical sense, it is first recorded 1744.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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treat in Medicine

treat (trēt)
v. treat·ed, treat·ing, treats

  1. To give medical aid to someone.

  2. To give medical aid to counteract a disease or condition.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Idioms and Phrases with treat
In addition to the idiom beginning with
treat
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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