treble

[treb-uhl]
adjective
1.
threefold; triple.
2.
Music.
a.
of or pertaining to the highest part in harmonized music; soprano.
b.
of the highest pitch or range, as a voice part, voice, singer, or instrument.
c.
high in pitch; shrill.
noun
3.
Music.
a.
the treble or soprano part.
b.
a treble voice, singer, or instrument.
4.
a high or shrill voice or sound.
5.
the highest-pitched peal of a bell.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), trebled, trebling.
6.
to make or become three times as much or as many; triple.

Origin:
1275–1325; (adj. and noun) Middle English < Middle French < Latin triplus triple; (v.) Middle English treblen, derivative of the adj.

trebly [treb-lee] , adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
treble (ˈtrɛbəl)
 
adj
1.  threefold; triple
2.  of, relating to, or denoting a soprano voice or part or a high-pitched instrument
 
n
3.  three times the amount, size, etc
4.  a soprano voice or part or a high-pitched instrument
5.  the highest register of a musical instrument
6.  a.  the high-frequency response of an audio amplifier, esp in a record player or tape recorder
 b.  a control knob on such an instrument by means of which the high-frequency gain can be increased or decreased
7.  bell-ringing the lightest and highest bell in a ring
8.  a.  the narrow inner ring on a dartboard
 b.  a hit on this ring
 
vb
9.  to make or become three times as much
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin triplus threefold, triple]
 
'trebleness
 
n
 
'trebly
 
adv, —adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

treble
late 14c., "three times, triple," from O.Fr. treble (12c.), from L. triplus (see triple). The verb is recorded from early 14c. The noun meaning "highest part in music, soprano" is attested from early 14c., from O.Fr. treble; in early contrapuntal music, the chief melody was
in the tenor, and the treble was the "third" part above it (after the alto).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
In its first version the scheme was even grander: its aim was to treble today's transfer.
Carrying a lock would probably treble the weight of the bike.
Experts predict that to meet the growing demand, operators in developed countries may have to treble the number of base stations.
Every word has a double, treble, or centuple use and meaning.
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