tug

[tuhg]
verb (used with object), tugged, tugging.
1.
to pull at with force, vigor, or effort.
2.
to move by pulling forcibly; drag; haul.
3.
to tow (a vessel) by means of a tugboat.
verb (used without object), tugged, tugging.
4.
to pull with force or effort: to tug at a stuck drawer.
5.
to strive hard; labor; toil.
noun
6.
an act or instance of tugging; pull; haul.
7.
a strenuous contest between opposing forces, groups, or persons; struggle: the tug of young minds in a seminar.
9.
that by which something is tugged, as a rope or chain.
10.
a.
trace2 ( def 1 ).
b.
any of various supporting or pulling parts.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English toggen to play-wrestle, contend; akin to Old English togian to tow1

tugger, noun
tugless, adjective
untugged, adjective


1. yank, jerk, wrench.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tug (tʌɡ)
 
vb (when intr, sometimes foll by at) , tugs, tugging, tugged
1.  to pull or drag with sharp or powerful movements: the boy tugged at the door handle
2.  (tr) to tow (a vessel) by means of a tug
3.  (intr) to work; toil
 
n
4.  a strong pull or jerk: he gave the rope a tug
5.  tugboat, Also called: towboat a boat with a powerful engine, used for towing barges, ships, etc
6.  a hard struggle or fight
7.  a less common word for trace
 
[C13: related to Old English tēon to tow1]
 
'tugger
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tug
early 13c., from weak grade of O.E. teohan "to pull, drag," from P.Gmc. *teukh- "pull," from PIE *deuk- "to pull, to lead" (see duke). Related to tow (1). The noun is recorded from c.1500; meaning "small steamer used to tow other vessels" is recorded
from 1817. Phrase tug of war (1670s) was originally figurative, "the decisive contest, the real struggle."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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