tulip

[too-lip, tyoo-]
noun
1.
any of various plants belonging to the genus Tulipa, of the lily family, cultivated in many varieties, and having lance-shaped leaves and large, showy, usually erect, cup-shaped or bell-shaped flowers in a variety of colors.
2.
a flower or bulb of such a plant.

Origin:
1570–80; earlier tulipa < Neo-Latin, apparently back formation from Italian tulipano (taken as adj.) < Turkish tülbent turban (from a fancied likeness); see turban

tuliplike, adjective
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World English Dictionary
tulip (ˈtjuːlɪp)
 
n
1.  any spring-blooming liliaceous plant of the temperate Eurasian genus Tulipa, having tapering bulbs, long broad pointed leaves, and single showy bell-shaped flowers
2.  the flower or bulb of any of these plants
 
[C17: from New Latin tulipa, from Turkish tülbend turban, which the opened bloom was thought to resemble]
 
'tulip-like
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tulip
1578, via Du. or Ger. tulpe, Fr. tulipe "a tulip," all ult. from Turk. tülbent "turban," also "gauze, muslin," from Pers. dulband "turban;" so called from the fancied resemblance of the flower to a turban. Introduced from Turkey to Europe, where the earliest known instance of a tulip flowering in
cultivation is 1559 in the garden of Johann Heinrich Herwart in Augsburg; popularized in Holland after 1587 by Clusius. The full form of the Turk. word is represented in It. tulipano, Sp. tulipan, but the -an tended to drop in Gmc. languages, where it was mistaken for a suffix. Tulip tree (1705), a North American magnolia, so called from its tulip-shaped flowers.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Maybe the best native species will be loblolly pine, oak and tulip-poplar.
The curl prevents the chenille stem from pulling out of the tulip and forms the center of the flower.
Every tulip bulb owner had made a fortune in mark to market terms, at some point.
Faster than a tulip opening after a few days of unseasonably warm spring weather.
Images for tulip
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