turgid

[tur-jid]
adjective
1.
swollen; distended; tumid.
2.
inflated, overblown, or pompous; bombastic: turgid language.

Origin:
1660–70; < Latin turgidus, equivalent to turg(ēre) to swell + -idus -id4

turgidity, turgidness, noun
turgidly, adverb
unturgid, adjective
unturgidly, adverb

1. torpid, turbid, turgid ; 2. turbid, turgid.
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World English Dictionary
turgid (ˈtɜːdʒɪd)
 
adj
1.  swollen and distended; congested
2.  (of style or language) pompous and high-flown; bombastic
 
[C17: from Latin turgidus, from turgēre to swell]
 
tur'gidity
 
n
 
'turgidness
 
n
 
'turgidly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

turgid
1620, from L. turgidus "swollen, inflated," from turgere "to swell," of unknown origin. Fig. use in reference to prose is from 1725.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

turgid tur·gid (tûr'jĭd)
adj.
Swollen or distended, as from a fluid; bloated; tumid.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Also, read the turgid in-room diaries of past occupants' amorous adventures.
The canvas was much too broad and turgid, the details too numerous and complex.
Erikson's writing is highly compressed and rather turgid.
The story inclines to be too turgid, eccentric, and overwrought.
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