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turnover

[turn-oh-ver] /ˈtɜrnˌoʊ vər/
noun
1.
an act or result of turning over; upset.
2.
change or movement of people, as tenants or customers, in, out, or through a place:
The restaurant did a lively business and had a rapid turnover.
3.
the aggregate of worker replacements in a given period in a given business or industry.
4.
the ratio of the labor turnover to the average number of employees in a given period.
5.
the total amount of business done in a given time.
6.
the rate at which items are sold, especially with reference to the depletion of stock and replacement of inventory:
Things are slow now, but they expect an increased turnover next month.
7.
the number of times that capital is invested and reinvested in a line of merchandise during a specified period of time.
8.
the turning over of the capital or stock of goods involved in a particular transaction or course of business.
9.
the rate of processing or the amount of material that has undergone a particular process in a given period of time, as in manufacturing.
10.
a change from one position, opinion, etc., to another, often to one that is opposed to that previously held.
11.
a reorganization of a political organization, business, etc., especially one involving a change or shift of personnel.
12.
a baked or deep-fried pastry with a sweet or savory filling in which half the dough is turned over the filling and the edges sealed to form a semicircle or triangle.
13.
Basketball, Football. the loss of possession of the ball to the opponents, through misplays or infractions of the rules.
adjective
14.
that is or may be turned over.
15.
having a part that turns over, as a collar.
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; noun use of verb phrase turn over
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for turnover
  • Low turnover in a mutual fund's portfolio can mean lower taxes for investors, especially under the new tax law.
  • The high turnover rate of chief academic officers is a disturbing but little-known fact in higher education today.
  • It was likely aided by a relatively slow turnover of plant types.
  • But the deeper layers of skin, called the dermis, do not go through this cellular turnover and so do not replace themselves.
  • Bespectacled business school graduates will tell you this turnover results from the low costs of switching.
  • High involuntary turnover rates sends a message too.
  • Even in recession, there is great turnover in the labour market.
  • The adding together of more exposures will evidently be needed to reach a fainter threshold and find the turnover.
  • In the labor market, he has focused on turnover and reallocation, research and development and personal relationships.
  • He plans to stick with his job for three years, a boon in an industry plagued by high turnover.
British Dictionary definitions for turnover

turn over

verb (adverb)
1.
to change or cause to change position, esp so as to reverse top and bottom
2.
to start (an engine), esp with a starting handle, or (of an engine) to start or function correctly
3.
to shift or cause to shift position, as by rolling from side to side
4.
(transitive) to deliver; transfer
5.
(transitive) to consider carefully: he turned over the problem for hours
6.
(transitive)
  1. to sell and replenish (stock in trade)
  2. to transact business and so generate gross revenue of (a specified sum)
7.
(transitive) to invest and recover (capital)
8.
(transitive) (slang) to rob
9.
(transitive) (slang) to defeat utterly
10.
turn over a new leaf, to reform; resolve to improve one's behaviour
noun
11.
  1. the amount of business, usually expressed in terms of gross revenue, transacted during a specified period
  2. (as modifier): a turnover tax
12.
the rate at which stock in trade is sold and replenished
13.
a change or reversal of position
14.
a small semicircular or triangular pastry case filled with fruit, jam, etc
15.
  1. the number of workers employed by a firm in a given period to replace those who have left
  2. the ratio between this number and the average number of employees during the same period
16.
(banking) the amount of capital funds loaned on call during a specified period
adjective
17.
(prenominal) able or designed to be turned or folded over: a turnover collar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for turnover
n.

1650s, "action of turning over," from the verbal phrase; see turn (v.) + over (adv.); meaning "kind of pastry tart" is attested from 1798. Meaning "number of employees leaving a place and being replaced" is recorded from 1955.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for turnover

turnout

noun
  1. An audience, the participants at a meeting, etc: We always get a good turnout for the council sessions (1816+)
  2. Clothing; dress; get-up, togs (1859+)
  3. A heterosexual man who turns homosexual: A Navy turnout is one who went in heterosexual but came out dreaming of pecker (1970s+ Homosexuals)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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