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twig1

[twig] /twɪg/
noun
1.
a slender shoot of a tree or other plant.
2.
a small offshoot from a branch or stem.
3.
a small, dry, woody piece fallen from a branch:
a fire of twigs.
4.
Anatomy. one of the minute branches of a blood vessel or nerve.
Origin
950
before 950; Middle English; Old English twig, twigge, orig. (something) divided in two; akin to Old High German zwīg (German Zweig), Dutch twijg; compare Sanskrit dvikás double
Related forms
twigless, adjective
twiglike, adjective

twig2

[twig] /twɪg/
verb (used with object), twigged, twigging.
1.
to look at; observe:
Now, twig the man climbing there, will you?
2.
to see; perceive:
Do you twig the difference in colors?
3.
to understand.
verb (used without object), twigged, twigging.
4.
to understand.
Origin
1755-65; < Irish tuigim I understand, with English w reflecting the offglide before i of the velarized Irish t typical of southern Ireland; cf. dig2

twig3

[twig] /twɪg/
noun, British
1.
style; fashion.
Origin
1805-15; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for twig
  • Wanda then picked up a small twig, perched herself on a sapling branch, and poked her stick in a downward direction.
  • Traditionally, biologists have celebrated the trunk, branch and twig system of a tree as no accident.
  • He could scarce believe his eyes when he found a twig of an oak, which he plucked from the branch, become gold in his hand.
  • The disease is caused by a non-native fungus which is transmitted by small twig beetles.
  • At full size, all but a few squeeze through holes in the caterpillar's skin and spin a cocoon on a nearby twig or leaf.
  • You'll also need pliers for bending wire over twig bundles.
  • The only identifiable object amid shards of wood was a twig wreath with red flowers.
  • The only flowers are the icicles on the eaves and the beads on each twig.
  • Each twig is linked to other twigs through a shared ancestry.
  • However, we're not talking about a broken twig or a pebble dropped in a stream.
British Dictionary definitions for twig

twig1

/twɪɡ/
noun
1.
any small branch or shoot of a tree or other woody plant
2.
something resembling this, esp a minute branch of a blood vessel
Derived Forms
twiglike, adjective
Word Origin
Old English twigge; related to Old Norse dvika consisting of two, Old High German zwīg twig, Old Danish tvige fork

twig2

/twɪɡ/
verb (Brit, informal) twigs, twigging, twigged
1.
to understand (something)
2.
to find out or suddenly comprehend (something) he hasn't twigged yet
3.
(transitive) (rare) to perceive (something)
Word Origin
C18: perhaps from Gaelic tuig I understand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for twig
n.

Old English twigge, from Proto-Germanic *twigan (cf. Middle Dutch twijch, Dutch twijg, Old High German zwig, German Zweig "branch, twig"), from the root of twi- (see twin), here meaning "forked" (as in Old English twisel "fork, point of division").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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twig in Technology

Tree-Walking Instruction Generator.
A code generator language. ML-Twig is an SML/NJ variant.
["Twig Language Manual", S.W.K. Tijang, CS TR 120, Bell Labs, 1986].
(1995-01-31)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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