twig

1 [twig]
noun
1.
a slender shoot of a tree or other plant.
2.
a small offshoot from a branch or stem.
3.
a small, dry, woody piece fallen from a branch: a fire of twigs.
4.
Anatomy. one of the minute branches of a blood vessel or nerve.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English; Old English twig, twigge, orig. (something) divided in two; akin to Old High German zwīg (German Zweig), Dutch twijg; compare Sanskrit dvikás double

twigless, adjective
twiglike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

twig

2 [twig] British.
verb (used with object), twigged, twigging.
1.
to look at; observe: Now, twig the man climbing there, will you?
2.
to see; perceive: Do you twig the difference in colors?
3.
to understand.
verb (used without object), twigged, twigging.
4.
to understand.

Origin:
1755–65; < Irish tuigim I understand, with English w reflecting the offglide before i of the velarized Irish t typical of southern Ireland; cf. dig2

twig

3 [twig]
noun British.
style; fashion.

Origin:
1805–15; origin uncertain

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
twig1 (twɪɡ)
 
n
1.  any small branch or shoot of a tree or other woody plant
2.  something resembling this, esp a minute branch of a blood vessel
 
[Old English twigge; related to Old Norse dvika consisting of two, Old High German zwīg twig, Old Danish tvige fork]
 
'twiglike1
 
adj

twig2 (twɪɡ)
 
vb , twigs, twigging, twigged
1.  to understand (something)
2.  to find out or suddenly comprehend (something): he hasn't twigged yet
3.  rare (tr) to perceive (something)
 
[C18: perhaps from Scottish Gaelic tuig I understand]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

twig
O.E. twigge, from P.Gmc. *twigan (cf. M.Du. twijch, Du. twijg, O.H.G. zwig, Ger. Zweig "branch, twig"), from the root of twi- (see twin), here meaning "forked" (as in O.E. twisel "fork, point of division"). Twiggy "slender" is recorded from 1562.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The earliest versions were probably twigs used to retrieve food from cooking
  pots.
The soft-bodied animals, a fraction of an inch long, resemble twigs and
  gumdrops in shape.
As the helicopter lands, they turn away, shielding their eyes from the dust and
  twigs kicked up by the rotors.
We still get a fair amount of dirt in the water, and twigs and such in the food.
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