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unbroken

[uhn-broh-kuh n] /ʌnˈbroʊ kən/
adjective
1.
not broken; whole; intact.
2.
uninterrupted; continuous.
3.
not tamed, as a horse.
4.
undisturbed; unimpaired.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English; see un-1, broken
Related forms
unbrokenly, adverb
unbrokenness, noun
Synonyms
1. complete, entire.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for unbroken
  • We seem to regard seven to eight hours of unbroken sleep as our birthright.
  • Therefore the connection between symmetrical counterparts remains unbroken while jumping into or out of a mirror.
  • They, collectively, have an almost unbroken track record of failure make up excuses by the truckload for their failings.
  • Rather they are different aspects of one whole and unbroken movement.
  • Even more odd, the street was filled by an unbroken silence.
  • But everywhere you see the water's work: canyon mazes, unbroken scarps, sandstone pillars.
  • Because rock types and styles of jewelry don't reflect unbroken descent from common ancestors.
  • First, your composition needs a straight, unbroken horizon line to disguise the graduated filter.
  • To check that your transaction is secure, look for the unbroken key or closed padlock icon in the corner of your browser screen.
  • He wears his baseball cap backward and speaks in a piping, unbroken voice.
British Dictionary definitions for unbroken

unbroken

/ʌnˈbrəʊkən/
adjective
1.
complete or whole
2.
continuous or incessant
3.
undaunted in spirit
4.
(of animals, esp horses) not tamed; wild
5.
not disturbed or upset the unbroken silence of the afternoon
6.
(of a record, esp at sport) not improved upon
7.
(of a contract, law, etc) not broken or infringed
Derived Forms
unbrokenly, adverb
unbrokenness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unbroken
unbroken
c.1300, in ref. to vows or compacts, from un- (1) "not" + pp. of break. Attested from 1495 in ref. to material things; 1513 in ref. to courage, spirit, etc.; 1538 in ref. to horses; 1561 in ref. to the flow of time.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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