uncolored

colored

[kuhl-erd]
adjective
1.
having color.
2.
Older Use: Offensive. belonging wholly or in part to any group of nonwhite people, especially to black people.
3.
Older Use: Offensive. pertaining to black people.
4.
influenced or biased: colored opinions.
5.
specious; deceptive: The authorities detected a colored quality in her statement.
6.
Botany. of some hue other than green.
noun
7.
Older Use: Offensive.
a.
a black person.
b.
the colored, black people as a group.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English; see color, -ed3

half-colored, adjective
uncolored, adjective
uncoloredly, adverb
uncoloredness, noun
undercolored, adjective
well-colored, adjective


2, 3, 7. See black.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

colored
in reference to "non-white skin," 1611; pp. adj. from color.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

color col·or (kŭl'ər)
n.

  1. That aspect of the appearance of objects and light sources that may be specified in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation.

  2. That portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum specified in terms of wavelength, luminosity, and purity.

  3. The general appearance of the skin.

  4. The skin pigmentation of a person not classified as white.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
color   (kŭl'ər)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. The sensation produced by the effect of light waves striking the retina of the eye. The color of something depends mainly on which wavelengths of light it emits, reflects, or transmits.

  2. Color charge. See also hadron.


Our Living Language  : When beams of colored light are mixed, or added, their wavelengths combine to form other colors. All spectral colors can be formed by mixing wavelengths corresponding to the additive primaries red, green, and blue. When two of the additive primaries are mixed in equal proportion, they form the complement of the third. Thus cyan (a mixture of green and blue) is the complement of red; magenta (a mixture of blue and red) is the complement of green; and yellow (a mixture of red and green) is the complement of blue. Mixing the three additive primaries in equal proportions reconstitutes white light. When light passes through a color filter, certain wavelengths are absorbed, or subtracted, while others are transmitted. The subtractive primaries cyan, magenta, and yellow can be combined using overlapping filters to form all other colors. When two of the subtractive primaries are combined in equal proportion, they form the additive primary whose wavelength they share. Thus overlapping filters of cyan (blue and green) and magenta (blue and red) filter out all wavelengths except blue; magenta (blue and red) and yellow (red and green) transmit only red; and yellow (red and green) and cyan (blue and green) transmit only green. Combining all three subtractive primaries in equal proportions filters out all wavelengths, producing black. Light striking a colored surface behaves similarly to light passing through a filter, with certain wavelengths being absorbed and others reflected. Pigments are combined to form different colors by a process of subtractive absorption of various wavelengths.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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