unconscionable

[uhn-kon-shuh-nuh-buhl]
adjective
1.
not guided by conscience; unscrupulous.
2.
not in accordance with what is just or reasonable: unconscionable behavior.
3.
excessive; extortionate: an unconscionable profit.

Origin:
1555–65; un-1 + conscionable

unconscionability, noun
unconscionably, adverb


3. extreme, immoderate, unwarranted, inordinate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To unconscionable
Collins
World English Dictionary
unconscionable (ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbəl)
 
adj
1.  unscrupulous or unprincipled: an unconscionable liar
2.  immoderate or excessive: unconscionable demands
 
un'conscionableness
 
n
 
un'conscionably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unconscionable
1560s, "showing no regard for conscience," from un- (1) + now rare conscionable "conscientious" (1540s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Contract terms are substantively unconscionable if they are unfair and commercially unreasonable.
Advocates for the poor consider such cuts unconscionable.
Using hunting permits as a political protection racket for the livestock
  community is what is so unconscionable about this hunt.
Most scientists agree that it is unconscionable to clone humans when tests in
  animals have not been perfected.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature