uncouth

[uhn-kooth]
adjective
1.
awkward, clumsy, or unmannerly: uncouth behavior; an uncouth relative who embarrasses the family.
2.
strange and ungraceful in appearance or form.
3.
unusual or strange.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English uncūth (see un-1, couth2); cognate with Dutch onkond

uncouthly, adverb
uncouthness, noun


1. discourteous, rude, uncivil. See boorish. 3. odd, unfamiliar.


1. courteous.
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World English Dictionary
uncouth (ʌnˈkuːθ)
 
adj
lacking in good manners, refinement, or grace
 
[Old English uncūth, from un-1 + cūth familiar; related to Old High German kund known, Old Norse kunnr]
 
un'couthly
 
adv
 
un'couthness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

uncouth
O.E. uncuð "unknown, uncertain, unfamiliar," from un- (1) "not" + cuð "known, well-known," pp. of cunnan "to know" (see can (v.)). Meaning "strange, crude, clumsy" is first recorded 1513. The compound (and the thing it describes) widespread
in IE languages, cf. L. ignorantem,, O.N. ukuðr, Goth. unkunþs, Skt. ajnatah, Armenian ancanaut', Gk. agnotos, O.Ir. ingnad "unknown."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He showed up rough, uncouth and unattractive, but he did start his law practice.
Even his hand, large and uncouth as they were, could not contain his whisk ers.
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