underfoot

[uhn-der-foot]
adverb
1.
under the foot or feet; on the ground; underneath or below: The climb was difficult because there were so many rocks underfoot.
2.
so as to form an obstruction, as in walking; in the way: the ends of her sash falling constantly underfoot.
adjective
3.
lying under the foot or feet; in a position to be trodden upon.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English underfot (adv.). See under-, foot

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
underfoot (ˌʌndəˈfʊt)
 
adv
1.  underneath the feet; on the ground
2.  in a position of subjugation or subservience
3.  in the way

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

underfoot
c.1200, underfot "under the feet," from under + foot. Cf. M.Du. ondervoete. As an adj., attested from 1596; in ref. to persons, "continually in the way," it is recorded from 1891.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Autumn leaves crinkle underfoot and the smell of apple cider fills the air,
  along with the shouts of overexcited preschoolers.
Tuck ground covers between pavers to create a living carpet underfoot.
Two fireplaces were lit and an elegant dachshund padded about underfoot.
Some of the groups had a dog underfoot throughout, while the others had none.
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