underlaid

[uhn-der-leyd]
adjective
1.
placed or laid underneath, as a foundation or substratum.
2.
having an underneath layer (often followed by with ): a lace tablecloth underlaid with damask; courtesy underlaid with reserve.
verb
3.
simple past tense and past participle of underlay.

Origin:
before 1100; late Old English under lede (not recorded in ME); see under-, laid

Dictionary.com Unabridged

underlay

[v. uhn-der-ley; n. uhn-der-ley]
verb (used with object), underlaid, underlaying.
1.
to lay under or beneath.
2.
to provide with something laid underneath; raise or support with something laid underneath: The manufacturer underlays the chrome finish with a zinc coating.
3.
to extend across the bottom of.
noun
4.
something underlaid.
5.
Printing. a piece or pieces of paper put under type or cuts to bring them to the proper height for printing.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English underleyen, Old English underlecgan; see under-, lay1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
underlaid (ˌʌndəˈleɪd)
 
adj
1.  laid underneath
2.  having an underlay or supporting layer underneath
 
vb
3.  the past tense and past participle of underlay

underlay
 
vb , -lays, -laying, -laid
1.  to place (something) under or beneath
2.  to support by something laid beneath
3.  to achieve the correct printing pressure all over (a forme block) or to bring (a block) up to type height by adding material, such as paper, to the appropriate areas beneath it
 
n
4.  a layer, lining, support, etc, laid underneath something else
5.  printing material, such as paper, used to underlay a forme or block
6.  felt, rubber, etc, laid beneath a carpet to increase insulation and resilience

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

underlay
O.E. under lecgan "to support by placing something beneath;" see under + lay (v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It will always be underlaid by another reservoir, and that in turn by another, and so on for a long way down.
These special pools form when natural shallow depressions underlaid with clay soils fill with winter rainwater.
Sometimes cobblestone walls are overlaid or underlaid by, or even intermingled with, sandstone walls.
Usually these brushlands were on soils underlaid with a clay pan that prevented trees from attaining much growth.
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