follow Dictionary.com

Capitol vs. capital? What's the difference?

undershot

[uhn-der-shot; for 3 also uhn-der-shot] /ˈʌn dərˌʃɒt; for 3 also ˌʌn dərˈʃɒt/
adjective
1.
having the front teeth of the lower jaw projecting in front of the upper teeth, as a bulldog.
2.
driven by water passing beneath:
an undershot vertical water wheel.
verb
3.
simple past tense and past participle of undershoot.
Origin of undershot
1600-1610
1600-10; under- + shot2

undershoot

[uhn-der-shoot, uhn-der-shoot] /ˌʌn dərˈʃut, ˈʌn dərˌʃut/
verb (used with object), undershot, undershooting.
1.
to shoot or launch a projectile that strikes under or short of (a target).
2.
Aeronautics. (of an aircraft or pilot) to land before reaching (a landing strip) because of a too rapid loss of altitude.
verb (used without object), undershot, undershooting.
3.
to shoot or launch a projectile so as to strike under or short of a target.
Origin
1655-65; under- + shoot1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for undershot
Historical Examples
  • Its volume is sufficient, even in time of severest drought, to turn the undershot wheel of a large mill.

  • The rest of the work is the same as for the undershot wheel.

    Woodworking for Beginners Charles Gardner Wheeler
  • Through green fields, in which the grass as rising high and sweet, a footpath took me by a solitary mill with an undershot wheel.

    Field and Hedgerow Richard Jefferies
  • With this undershot wheel, the shoot represented in the plate is not required.

    Toy-Making in School and Home Ruby Kathleen Polkinghorne and Mabel Irene Rutherford Polkinghorne
  • He was heavily built, with an undershot jaw and a patch of liverish birthmark on his cheek.

    The Last Shot Frederick Palmer
  • Scoop wheels are similar to undershot water wheels, and centrifugal pumps to turbines.

  • This circulation causes the undershot wheel to revolve, and its revolutions are registered by the clockwork.

  • Sawyer Gundry could have taken him with one hand and tossed him over the undershot wheel.

    Erema R. D. Blackmore
  • undershot wheel, and it looks as though it could be raised or lowered.

    The Return H. Beam Piper and John J. McGuire
  • Hooker's cheeks were flushed and he faced Herbert, his undershot jaw seeming to project still further than usual.

British Dictionary definitions for undershot

undershot

/ˈʌndəˌʃɒt/
adjective
1.
(of the lower jaw) projecting beyond the upper jaw; underhung
2.
(of a water wheel) driven by a flow of water that passes under the wheel rather than over it See overshot

undershoot

/ˌʌndəˈʃuːt/
verb -shoots, -shooting, -shot
1.
(of a pilot) to cause (an aircraft) to land short of (a runway) or (of an aircraft) to land in this way
2.
to shoot a projectile so that it falls short of (a target)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for undershot

undershoot

v.

1660s, "to shoot too low," from under + shoot (v.). In reference to aircraft or pilots, recorded from 1918. Undershot as a type of water wheel is recorded from c.1600.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
undershot in Medicine

undershoot un·der·shoot (ŭn'dər-shōōt')
n.
A temporary decrease below the final steady-state value that may occur immediately following the removal of an influence that had been raising that value.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for undershot

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for undershot

0
14
Scrabble Words With Friends