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endow

[en-dou] /ɛnˈdaʊ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to provide with a permanent fund or source of income:
to endow a college.
2.
to furnish, as with some talent, faculty, or quality; equip:
Nature has endowed her with great ability.
3.
Obsolete. to provide with a dower.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of a life-insurance policy) to become payable; yield its conditions.
Origin of endow
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English endowen < Old French endouer, equivalent to en- en-1 + douer < Latin dōtāre to dower, equivalent to dōt- (stem of dōs) dowry + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
endower, noun
reendow, verb (used with object)
superendow, verb (used with object)
unendowed, adjective
unendowing, adjective
well-endowed, adjective
Synonyms
2. invest, clothe, endue.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for unendowed
Historical Examples
  • unendowed as we are, with any faculty of foreseeing the future, it may be difficult for us to conceive of such a faculty in God.

  • Plants are unendowed with organs of locomotion, their food must therefore be within easy reach.

    The Stock-Feeder's Manual Charles Alexander Cameron
  • Dont fling your mothers money into the bottomless pit of this unendowed, burnt-out, unpopular enterprise!

    A Singular Life Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • He has no longer to compare the moral and religious influence of an endowed, with that of an unendowed clergy.

  • Individual enterprise, unendowed but unfettered, built the main buttresses of the British colonial empire.

    The English in the West Indies James Anthony Froude
  • Rights and powrers can only belong to persons, not to things, not to mere matter, unendowed with will.

  • But woe to him who, unendowed by nature with their gifts, seeks to imitate them.

  • Five of the houses are endowed, and the pensioners pass on in rotation from the unendowed to the endowed rooms.

    Hammersmith, Fulham and Putney Geraldine Edith Mitton
  • As hospitia or diversoria literarum signified the unendowed house, so domus or aula scholarium signified the endowed house.

    Cambridge Mildred Anna Rosalie Tuker
  • Her gifts, if she had any, were of another sort; and she was by no means willing to think of herself as one unendowed with gifts.

    Ralph the Heir Anthony Trollope
British Dictionary definitions for unendowed

endow

/ɪnˈdaʊ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to provide with or bequeath a source of permanent income
2.
(usually foll by with) to provide (with qualities, characteristics, etc)
3.
(obsolete) to provide with a dower
Derived Forms
endower, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French endouer, from en-1 + douer, from Latin dōtāre, from dōs dowry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unendowed

endow

v.

late 14c., indowen "provide an income for," from Anglo-French endover, from en- "in" + Old French douer "endow," from Latin dotare "bestow" (see dowry). Related: Endowed; endowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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