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unfair

[uhn-fair] /ʌnˈfɛər/
adjective
1.
not fair; not conforming to approved standards, as of justice, honesty, or ethics:
an unfair law; an unfair wage policy.
2.
disproportionate; undue; beyond what is proper or fitting:
an unfair share.
Origin
900
before 900; 1705-15 for def 1; Middle English: uncomely, ugly; Old English unfæger; cognate with Old Norse ūfagr. See un-1, fair1
Related forms
unfairly, adverb
unfairness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for unfair
  • He got a ton of publicity for his tirade, a reward that was pretty unfair in and of itself.
  • Wait lists are another unfair practice which needs to be examined carefully.
  • Without these conditions, trade quickly becomes inefficient and unfair.
  • Opponents to globalization blame free trade for unfair working conditions.
  • Work from high school students is screened alongside that of more experienced animators, inviting unfair comparisons.
  • That's unfair precisely because people aren't given the chance to decide for themselves.
  • And the new cry from the hired hands of the rich is that it's unfair that the wealthy should pay such a large share of taxes.
  • It is difficult to piece together the key elements of the bureaucratic train wreck that led to this unfair decision.
  • After all it's unfair for pack leaders to create this type of excited greeting and then expect him to know the difference later.
  • The individual who received an unfair distribution refused to take part in the study.
British Dictionary definitions for unfair

unfair

/ʌnˈfɛə/
adjective
1.
characterized by inequality or injustice
2.
dishonest or unethical
Derived Forms
unfairly, adverb
unfairness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for unfair
adj.

Old English unfægr "unlovely," from un- (1) "not" + fair. Cf. Old Norse ufagr, Gothic unfagrs. Meaning "wicked, evil, bad" is recorded from c.1300. Sense of "not equitable, unjust" is first recorded 1713. Related: Unfairly; unfairness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
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