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unmanned

[uhn-mand] /ʌnˈmænd/
adjective
1.
without the physical presence of people in control:
an unmanned spacecraft.
2.
Falconry. (of a captured hawk) untrained for hunting with a master; unmade.
Origin of unmanned
1535-1545
1535-45; un-1 + manned

unman

[uhn-man] /ʌnˈmæn/
verb (used with object), unmanned, unmanning.
1.
to deprive of courage or fortitude; break down the manly spirit of:
Constant conflict finally unmanned him.
2.
to deprive of virility; emasculate; castrate.
Origin
1590-1600; un-2 + man1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for unmanned
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • When Biddle fell, Amos, with the instinct of the mariner, had rushed towards the unmanned helm.

  • For all my callousness I was sick and unmanned by that which had befallen.

    The Suitors of Yvonne Raphael Sabatini
  • There was something in the tone of his voice that had unmanned him.

    Caleb West, Master Diver F. Hopkinson Smith
  • Her voice, its sweet tones breaking a little at the last, unmanned me.

  • Thereupon the skipper tore his hair and cried aloud, for all his men had landed and the ship was unmanned.

    Albert Durer T. Sturge Moore
British Dictionary definitions for unmanned

unmanned

/ʌnˈmænd/
adjective
1.
lacking personnel or crew: an unmanned ship
2.
(of aircraft, spacecraft, etc) operated by automatic or remote control
3.
uninhabited
4.
(falconry) (of a hawk or falcon) not yet trained to accept humans

unman

/ʌnˈmæn/
verb (transitive) -mans, -manning, -manned
1.
to cause to lose courage or nerve
2.
to make effeminate
3.
to remove the men from
4.
(archaic) to deprive of human qualities
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unmanned
adj.

"not furnished with a crew," 1540s, from un- (2) + man (v).

unman

v.

1590s, "to deprive of the attributes of a human being," from un- (2) + verbal derivative of man (n.). Meaning "to deprive of manly courage" is attested from c.1600; that of "to emasculate" is from 1680s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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