unravel

[uhn-rav-uhl]
verb (used with object), unraveled, unraveling or (especially British) unravelled, unravelling.
1.
to separate or disentangle the threads of (a woven or knitted fabric, a rope, etc.).
2.
to free from complication or difficulty; make plain or clear; solve: to unravel a situation; to unravel a mystery.
3.
Informal. to take apart; undo; destroy (a plan, agreement, or arrangement).
verb (used without object), unraveled, unraveling or (especially British) unravelled, unravelling.
4.
to become unraveled.

Origin:
1595–1605; un-2 + ravel

unraveler; especially British, unraveller, noun
unravelment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unravel (ʌnˈrævəl)
 
vb , (US) -els, -elling, -elled, -els, -eling, -eled
1.  (tr) to reduce (something knitted or woven) to separate strands
2.  (tr) to undo or untangle (something tangled or knotted)
3.  (tr) to explain or solve: the mystery was unravelled
4.  (intr) to become unravelled
 
un'raveller
 
n
 
un'ravelment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unravel
c.1600, from un- (2) + ravel.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Soon after arriving, the promises made and the perceptions presented at the
  interview began to unravel.
Any reverse could unravel the political system they have created.
If that happens, the forest's ecology will begin to unravel.
New findings are helping to unravel why this is the case.
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