unsavory

[uhn-sey-vuh-ree]
adjective
1.
not savory; tasteless or insipid: an unsavory meal.
2.
unpleasant in taste or smell; distasteful.
3.
unappealing or disagreeable, as a pursuit: Poor teachers can make education unsavory.
4.
socially or morally objectionable or offensive: an unsavory past; an unsavory person.
Also, especially British, unsavoury.


Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English; see un-1, savory1

unsavorily, adverb
unsavoriness, noun


1. flat, unappetizing.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unsavoury or unsavory (ʌnˈseɪvərɪ)
 
adj
1.  objectionable or distasteful: an unsavoury character
2.  disagreeable in odour or taste
 
unsavory or unsavory
 
adj
 
un'savourily or unsavory
 
adv
 
un'savorily or unsavory
 
adv
 
un'savouriness or unsavory
 
n
 
un'savoriness or unsavory
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unsavory
early 13c., "tasteless, insipid," from un- (1) "not" + savory (adj.). Meaning "unpleasant or disagreeable to the taste" is attested from late 14c.; of persons, from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It's the human equivalent of the bumblebees' unsavoury diet.
The past offers all sorts of unsavoury stories of behaviour brought into the
  realm of medicine with dire effects.
The country's politicians are mostly an unsavoury lot.
But the newsletters shed light on some of the unsavoury fellow-travellers he
  has collected on his long political road.
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