unscrupulous

[uhn-skroo-pyuh-luhs]
adjective
not scrupulous; unrestrained by scruples; conscienceless; unprincipled.

Origin:
1795–1805; un-1 + scrupulous

unscrupulously, adverb
unscrupulousness, unscrupulosity [uhn-skroo-pyuh-los-i-tee] , noun


Unscrupulous, unprincipled refer to lack of moral standards or conscience to guide one's conduct. The unscrupulous person is without scruples of conscience, and disregards, or has contempt for, laws of right or justice with which he or she is perfectly well acquainted, and which should restrain his or her actions: unscrupulous in methods of making money, in taking advantage of the unfortunate. The unprincipled person is without moral principles or ethical standards in his or her conduct or actions: an unprincipled rogue; unprincipled conduct.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unscrupulous (ʌnˈskruːpjʊləs)
 
adj
without scruples; unprincipled
 
un'scrupulously
 
adv
 
un'scrupulousness
 
n
 
unscrupulosity
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unscrupulous
1803, from un- (1) "not" + scrupulous.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Some unscrupulous drivers will claim not to have change, and will even swap
  your legitimate cash for fake bills.
It was unscrupulous labeling not a loophole in the regulation.
Any system that turns out to be a useful way to measure influence will tempt
  the unscrupulous to try and game it, though.
If not, then you are an unscrupulous, depraved monster with no shred of human
  decency.
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