untoward

[uhn-tawrd, -tohrd]
adjective
1.
unfavorable or unfortunate: Untoward circumstances forced him into bankruptcy.
2.
improper: untoward social behavior.
3.
Archaic. froward; perverse.

Origin:
1520–30; un-1 + toward

untowardly, adverb
untowardness, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
untoward (ˌʌntəˈwɔːd, ʌnˈtəʊəd)
 
adj
1.  characterized by misfortune, disaster, or annoyance
2.  not auspicious; adverse; unfavourable
3.  unseemly or improper
4.  out of the ordinary; out of the way
5.  archaic refractory; perverse
6.  obsolete awkward, ungainly, or uncouth
 
unto'wardly
 
adv
 
unto'wardness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

untoward
1526, "not having inclination" (to or for something), also "difficult to manage, unruly," from un- (1) "not" + toward.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The immediate cause of everyone's distress is an untoward sequence of weather
  events.
Psychiatry is a eon behind any such revelation of the untoward ontology of
  nightmares.
Altering memory in response to group influence may produce untoward effects.
Although the overwhelming majority of egg donors suffer no untoward
  consequences, there are medical risks to providing eggs.
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