unwieldy

[uhn-weel-dee]
adjective, unwieldier, unwieldiest.
not wieldy; wielded with difficulty; not readily handled or managed in use or action, as from size, shape, or weight; awkward; ungainly.
Also, unwieldly.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English unweldy. See un-1, wieldy

unwieldily, adverb
unwieldiness, noun


bulky, unmanageable, clumsy.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unwieldy or unwieldly (ʌnˈwiːldɪ)
 
adj
1.  too heavy, large, or awkwardly shaped to be easily handled
2.  ungainly; clumsy
 
unwieldly or unwieldly
 
adj
 
un'wieldily or unwieldly
 
adv
 
un'wieldlily or unwieldly
 
adv
 
un'wieldiness or unwieldly
 
n
 
un'wieldliness or unwieldly
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unwieldy
late 14c., "lacking strength," from un- (1) "not" + O.E. wielde "active, vigorous," from P.Gmc. *walth- "have power" (see wield). Meaning "moving ungracefully" is recorded from 1530; in ref. to weapons, "difficult to handle, awkward by virtue of size or shape" it is attested from 1547.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Bar soap is a convenient option for the bathroom, but when a bar gets to be too
  small, it becomes unwieldy and inconvenient.
Now the agency has decided that things were a bit unwieldy and it is
  reorganizing the seven departments into three divisions.
Scholars who are familiar with such citations agree that the current formats
  remain unwieldy.
German spelling does need overhauling: over the decades, it has grown more
  unwieldy.
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