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uproot

[uhp-root, -roo t] /ʌpˈrut, -ˈrʊt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to pull out by or as if by the roots:
The hurricane uprooted many trees and telephone poles.
2.
to remove violently or tear away from a native place or environment:
The industrial revolution uprooted large segments of the rural population.
3.
to destroy or eradicate as if by pulling out roots:
The conquerors uprooted many of the native traditions.
4.
to displace, as from a home or country; tear away, as from customs or a way of life:
to uproot a people.
verb (used without object)
5.
to become uprooted.
Origin
1610-1620
1610-20; up- + root2
Related forms
uprootedness, noun
uprooter, noun
Synonyms
3. extirpate, banish, eliminate, remove.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for uproot
  • Such being the case, it would seem at first sight extraordinary that it should be so difficult to uproot the system.
  • Never uproot or cut wildflowers, and be careful not to trample the plants.
  • But it still escapes many politicians, who blindly uproot flowers, ignorant of the celestial commotion that may ensue.
  • Winds can uproot trees and overturn single-wide mobile homes.
  • Alex couldn't possibly grasp what it really meant to uproot our family.
  • Healthy trees will uproot, especially where ground is saturated.
British Dictionary definitions for uproot

uproot

/ʌpˈruːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to pull up by or as if by the roots
2.
to displace (a person or persons) from native or habitual surroundings
3.
to remove or destroy utterly
Derived Forms
uprootedness, noun
uprooter, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for uproot
v.

1590s (implied in uprooted), in the figurative sense, from up + root. The literal sense is first recorded 1690s. Related: Uprooted; uprooting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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