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7 Essential Words of Fall

urge

[urj] /ɜrdʒ/
verb (used with object), urged, urging.
1.
to push or force along; impel with force or vigor:
to urge the cause along.
2.
to drive with incitement to speed or effort:
to urge dogs on with shouts.
3.
to press, push, or hasten (the course, activities, etc.):
to urge one's escape.
4.
to impel, constrain, or move to some action:
urged by necessity.
5.
to endeavor to induce or persuade, as by entreaties; entreat or exhort earnestly:
to urge a person to greater caution.
6.
to press (something) upon the attention:
to urge a claim.
7.
to insist on, allege, or assert with earnestness:
to urge the need of haste.
8.
to press by persuasion or recommendation, as for acceptance, performance, or use; recommend or advocate earnestly:
to urge a plan of action.
verb (used without object), urged, urging.
9.
to exert a driving or impelling force; give an impulse to haste or action:
Hunger urges.
10.
to make entreaties or earnest recommendations.
11.
to press arguments or allegations, as against a person, action, or cause:
The senator urged against the confirmation of the appointment.
noun
12.
an act of urging; impelling action, influence, or force; impulse.
13.
an involuntary, natural, or instinctive impulse:
the sex urge.
Origin
1550-1560
1550-60; < Latin urgēre to press, force, drive, urge
Related forms
urgingly, adverb
overurge, verb, overurged, overurging.
unurged, adjective
unurging, adjective
Synonyms
4. incite, goad, stimulate, spur. 7. aver, asseverate.
Antonyms
1–3. deter. 4, 5. discourage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for urged
  • But it isn't clear what characteristics chimpanzees have that macaques don't that explain the distinction urged by the editors.
  • During her talk, she urged physicians to continue efforts to pin down treatments that work.
  • But she urged caution, noting that caffeinated coffee has received mixed reviews from the scientific community.
  • US officials have urged a wider evacuation area and warn that it could take weeks to get the crisis under control.
  • He urged that masks be distributed immediately to protect people from breathing the ash.
  • Birds are urged northward in the spring by rising temperatures, increasing moisture, and decreasing pressure.
  • The researchers urged the use of interdisciplinary approaches in future studies.
  • The agency urged prompt action at the federal level to limit the number of invasive pythons released into the wild.
  • Members were urged to contact the television networks to see if they would consider moving prime time earlier.
  • He urged the urgent installation of a new pumping station and upgrades of the high-density sludge treatment works.
British Dictionary definitions for urged

urge

/ɜːdʒ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to plead, press, or move (someone to do something): we urged him to surrender
2.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to advocate or recommend earnestly and persistently; plead or insist on: to urge the need for safety
3.
(transitive) to impel, drive, or hasten onwards: he urged the horses on
4.
(transitive) (archaic or literary) to stimulate, excite, or incite
noun
5.
a strong impulse, inner drive, or yearning
Word Origin
C16: from Latin urgēre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for urged

urge

v.

1550s, from Latin urgere "to press hard, push, drive, compel," from PIE root *werg- "to work" (cf. Avestan vareza "work, activity;" Greek ergon "work," orgia "religious performances," organon "tool;" Armenian gorc "work;" Lithuanian verziu "tie, fasten, squeeze," vargas "need, distress;" Old Church Slavonic vragu "enemy;" Gothic waurkjan, Old English wyrcan "work;" Gothic wrikan "persecute," Old English wrecan "drive, hunt, pursue;" Old Norse yrka "work, take effect"). Related: Urged; urging.

n.

1610s, from urge (v.); in frequent use after c.1910.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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