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valiant

[val-yuh nt] /ˈvæl yənt/
adjective
1.
boldly courageous; brave; stout-hearted:
a valiant soldier.
2.
marked by or showing bravery or valor; heroic:
to make a valiant effort.
3.
worthy; excellent.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English valia(u)nt < Anglo-French; Middle French vaillant, present participle of valoir to be of worth < Latin valēre; see -ant
Related forms
valiantly, adverb
valiantness, noun
overvaliant, adjective
overvaliantly, adverb
overvaliantness, noun
unvaliant, adjective
unvaliantly, adverb
unvaliantness, noun
Synonyms
1. valorous, dauntless. See brave.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for valiant
  • After a valiant effort, the shark still couldn't orient itself properly.
  • He had even fought the captain's valiant attempt at recovery.
  • And when he was dead all his former merits and his valiant acts were remembered.
  • Join to them also sturdy and valiant beggars, cloaking their idle life under the colour of some disease or sickness.
  • It's probably a quixotic effort, but it is nevertheless touchingly valiant.
  • The lid was padlocked shut, which did not help this valiant performer compete with the surrounding noise.
  • valiant rescue and relief efforts continue nonstop, and no looting has been reported.
  • The ring had much sentimental value, and she made a valiant effort to have a new one made, with demoralizing results.
  • At times it appears no calamity, not even this bombing, can unhinge these valiant investigators.
  • valiant attempts will certainly be made to defend the motives and methods of biocide users.
British Dictionary definitions for valiant

valiant

/ˈvæljənt/
adjective
1.
courageous, intrepid, or stout-hearted; brave
2.
marked by bravery or courage a valiant deed
Derived Forms
valiance, valiancy, noun
valiantly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French vaillant, from valoir to be of value, from Latin valēre to be strong
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for valiant
adj.

early 14c. (late 12c. in surnames), from Anglo-French and Old French valliant "stalwart, brave," from present participle of valoir "be worthy," originally "be strong," from Latin valere "be strong, be well, be worth, have power, be able," from PIE root *wal- "be strong" (cf. Old English wealdan "to rule," Old High German -walt, -wald "power" (in personal names), Old Norse valdr "ruler," Old Church Slavonic vlasti "to rule over," Lithuanian valdyti "to have power," Celtic *walos- "ruler," Old Irish flaith "dominion," Welsh gallu "to be able"). Related: Valiantly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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