vast

[vast, vahst]
adjective, vaster, vastest.
1.
of very great area or extent; immense: the vast reaches of outer space.
2.
of very great size or proportions; huge; enormous: vast piles of rubble left in the wake of the war.
3.
very great in number, quantity, amount, etc.: vast sums of money.
4.
very great in degree, intensity, etc.: an artisan of vast skill.
noun
5.
Literary. an immense or boundless expanse or space.

Origin:
1565–75; < Latin vastus empty, immense

vastly, adverb
vastness, noun
supervast, adjective
supervastly, adverb
supervastness, noun


1. measureless, boundless, gigantic, colossal, stupendous.


1. small.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
vast (vɑːst)
 
adj
1.  unusually large in size, extent, degree, or number; immense
2.  (prenominal) (intensifier): in vast haste
 
n
3.  poetic chiefly the vast immense or boundless space
4.  dialect (Brit) a very great amount or number
 
[C16: from Latin vastus deserted]
 
'vastity
 
n
 
'vastly
 
adv
 
'vastness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vast
1575, from M.Fr. vaste, from L. vastus "immense, extensive, huge," also "desolate, unoccupied, empty." The two meanings probably originally attached to two separate words, one with a long -a- one with a short -a-, that merged in early Latin (see waste). Very popular early 18c. as an intensifier.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
What a brilliant adaptation of a vast range of subjects and periods.
Local journalists and insiders claim the vast majority range from total
  washouts to outright frauds.
The painting contrasts the vast number of bison swimming across the river with
  the handful of explorers in a rowboat.
But it is more illuminating to think of them as stars in the sky, scattered
  more or less at random over a vast canvas.
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