verbatim

[ver-bey-tim]
adverb
1.
in exactly the same words; word for word: to repeat something verbatim.
adjective
2.
corresponding word for word to the original source or text: a verbatim record of the proceedings.
3.
skilled at recording or noting down speeches, proceedings, etc., with word-for-word accuracy: a verbatim stenographer.

Origin:
1475–85; < Medieval Latin verbātim, equivalent to verb(um) word + -ātim adv. suffix

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verbatim et literatim

[wer-bah-tim et lee-te-rah-tim; English ver-bey-tim et lit-uh-rey-tim]
Latin.
word for word and letter for letter; in exactly the same words.
Also, verbatim ac literatim [wer-bah-tim ahk lee-te-rah-tim; English ver-bey-tim ak lit-uh-rey-tim] .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
verbatim (vɜːˈbeɪtɪm)
 
adv, —adj
using exactly the same words; word for word
 
[C15: from Medieval Latin: word by word, from Latin verbum word]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

verbatim
1481, from M.L. verbatim "word for word," from L. verbum "word" (see verb).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
What the video does is give me almost verbatim what was written in the paper
  article.
For those who can't be bothered to read the whole paper, here are the other
  findings, quoted verbatim.
Some of the outline's language appeared verbatim in the final journal article.
One scene from the book is played almost verbatim in the film.
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