victor

[vik-ter]

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Latin, equivalent to vic-, variant stem of vincere to conquer + -tor -tor

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Victor

[vik-ter]
noun
1.
an ancient Roman epithet variously applied to Jupiter, Mars, and Hercules.
2.
Military. the NATO name for a class of nuclear-powered Soviet attack submarines.
3.
a male given name.

Victor I

noun
Saint, pope a.d. 189–198.

Victor II

noun
(Gebhard) 1018–57, German ecclesiastic: pope 1055–57.

Victor III

noun
(Dauferius) 1027–87, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1086–87.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
victor (ˈvɪktə)
 
n
1.  a.  a person, nation, etc, that has defeated an adversary in war, etc
 b.  (as modifier): the victor army
2.  the winner of any contest, conflict, or struggle
 
[C14: from Latin, from vincere to conquer]

Victor (ˈvɪktə)
 
n
communications a code word for the letter v

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

victor
mid-14c., from L. victorem (nom. victor) "a conqueror," agent noun from pp. stem of vincere "to conquer," from PIE base *weik- "to fight, conquer" (cf. Lith. apveikiu "to subdue, overcome," O.C.S. veku "strength, power, age," O.N. vigr "able in battle," O.E. wigan "fight," Welsh gwych "brave, energetic,"
O.Ir. fichim "I fight," second element in Celt. Ordovices "those who fight with hammers").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

victor

see to the victor belong the spoils.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
Almost all their supporters will back the primary's victor.
In contrast with previous computer-industry battles, a single victor seems unlikely this time around.
The staff of a losing campaign are a lot more ready and able to speak frankly than the staff of the victor.
Whoever is proclaimed the victor may have trouble establishing their legitimacy.
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