violent

[vahy-uh-luhnt]
adjective
1.
acting with or characterized by uncontrolled, strong, rough force: a violent earthquake.
2.
caused by injurious or destructive force: a violent death.
3.
intense in force, effect, etc.; severe; extreme: violent pain; violent cold.
4.
roughly or immoderately vehement or ardent: violent passions.
5.
furious in impetuosity, energy, etc.: violent haste.
6.
of, pertaining to, or constituting a distortion of meaning or fact.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Latin violentus, equivalent to vi-, shortening (before a vowel) of base of vīs force, violence + -olentus, variant (after a vowel) of -ulentus -ulent

violently, adverb
overviolent, adjective
overviolently, adverb
overviolentness, noun
quasi-violent, adjective
quasi-violently, adverb
self-violent, adjective
ultraviolent, adjective
ultraviolently, adverb
unviolent, adjective
unviolently, adverb

violent, virulent.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
violent (ˈvaɪələnt)
 
adj
1.  marked or caused by great physical force or violence: a violent stab
2.  (of a person) tending to the use of violence, esp in order to injure or intimidate others
3.  marked by intensity of any kind: a violent clash of colours
4.  characterized by an undue use of force; severe; harsh
5.  caused by or displaying strong or undue mental or emotional force: a violent tongue
6.  tending to distort the meaning or intent: a violent interpretation of the text
 
[C14: from Latin violentus, probably from vīs strength]
 
'violently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

violent
mid-14c.; see violence. In M.E. the word also was applied in reference to heat, sunlight, smoke, etc., with the sense "having some quality so strongly as to produce a powerful effect." Related: Violently.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Springtime brings the possibility of extreme weather, including violent
  thunder-storms and tornadoes.
Severe mental illness alone is not generally enough to cause violent behavior.
The mood was described as somber in places, and bordering on violent in others.
It's awful that there are so many violent protests happening right now.
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