virtually

[vur-choo-uh-lee] /ˈvɜr tʃu ə li/
adverb
1.
for the most part; almost wholly; just about:
"He is virtually unknown."
Origin
1400–50; late Middle English; see virtual, -ly
Can be confused
figuratively, literally, virtually (see usage note at literally)
Example Sentences for virtually
Today, however, virtually every college and university in the nation has an elaborate strategic plan.
Demography means virtually all of us will have to work longer.
The same features have emerged, and they are virtually indistinguishable from tissue samples from modern species.
Scientists often experiment virtually with computer models, but developing such software is time-consuming and difficult.
As a seaman he'd suffered several setbacks and was virtually broke.
Before the remodel, the outdoor space in back was virtually ignored.
For the first time, a robotic system has made a novel scientific discovery with virtually no human intellectual input.
Most city skies have become virtually empty of stars.
The system could make it possible to identify food contamination virtually instantly.
They contained everything that was needed to support life underground and were virtually impervious to enemy infiltration.
British Dictionary definitions for virtually
virtually (ˈvɜːtʃʊəlɪ)
 
adv
in effect though not in fact; practically; nearly

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Word Origin and History for virtually
virtually
early 15c., "as far as essential qualities or facts are concerned;" from virtual. Sense of "in effect, as good as" is recorded from c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Rhymes with virtually

Difficulty index for virtually

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Tile value for virtually

15
18
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