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voided

[voi-did] /ˈvɔɪ dɪd/
adjective
1.
having a void.
2.
having been made void:
a voided contract.
3.
having a section or area that has been cut out or omitted:
a voided Greek cross.
4.
Heraldry. (of a charge) depicted as if the center had been removed so as to leave only an outline:
an inescutcheon voided.
Origin of voided
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English; see void, -ed2
Related forms
unvoided, adjective

void

[void] /vɔɪd/
adjective
1.
Law. having no legal force or effect; not legally binding or enforceable.
2.
useless; ineffectual; vain.
3.
devoid; destitute (usually followed by of):
a life void of meaning.
4.
without contents; empty.
5.
without an incumbent, as an office.
6.
Mathematics. (of a set) empty.
7.
(in cards) having no cards in a suit.
noun
8.
an empty space; emptiness:
He disappeared into the void.
9.
something experienced as a loss or privation:
His death left a great void in her life.
10.
a gap or opening, as in a wall.
11.
a vacancy; vacuum.
12.
Typography. counter3 (def 10).
13.
(in cards) lack of cards in a suit:
a void in clubs.
verb (used with object)
14.
to make ineffectual; invalidate; nullify:
to void a check.
15.
to empty; discharge; evacuate:
to void excrement.
16.
to clear or empty (often followed by of):
to void a chamber of occupants.
17.
Archaic. to depart from; vacate.
verb (used without object)
18.
to defecate or urinate.
Origin
1250-1300; (adj.) Middle English voide < Anglo-French, Old French < Vulgar Latin *vocīta, feminine of *vocītus, dissimilated variant of Latin vocīvus, itself variant of vac(ī)vus empty; see vacuum; (v.) Middle English voiden < Anglo-French voider, Old French < Vulgar Latin *vocītāre, derivative of *vocītus; (noun) derivative of the adj.
Related forms
voidness, noun
nonvoid, adjective, noun
prevoid, verb (used with object)
unvoid, adjective
unvoidness, noun
Synonyms
3, 4. See empty. 5. vacant, unoccupied. 8. vacuum.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for voided
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • There have been, however, various and indisputable evidences of hairs found in the kidneys, and voided by natural discharge.

  • There was no doubt as to their origin for they were voided while the physician was in the room.

    Handbook of Medical Entomology William Albert Riley
  • "Listen to catch his name," whispered Cleo, but a call for "Tommie" voided the suggestion.

  • Anon they parted with a kiss and voided merrily King Gunther's land.

  • Then straightway Sir Tristram voided his saddle and drew his sword and dressed his shield.

  • Crest / a reform tortoise of the rand emergent couped at the neck proper disarmed and voided of assets.

    "Mr Punch's" Book of Arms Edward Tennyson Reed
  • The hogs evidently thought it feed time, for they rushed forward and began to squabble over the voided matter.

    Lincolniana Andrew Adderup
  • I know full well, that my castles and my lands will be voided for you to-day through the hand of one of these men.

  • On administration of a vermifuge he voided one of the rat-tailed maggots of Eristalis.

    Handbook of Medical Entomology William Albert Riley
British Dictionary definitions for voided

voided

/ˈvɔɪdɪd/
adjective
1.
(heraldry) (of a design) with a hole in the centre of the same shape as the design: a voided lozenge
2.
(rare) having a void or made void

void

/vɔɪd/
adjective
1.
without contents; empty
2.
not legally binding: null and void
3.
(of an office, house, position, etc) without an incumbent; unoccupied
4.
(postpositive) foll by of. destitute or devoid: void of resources
5.
having no effect; useless: all his efforts were rendered void
6.
(of a card suit or player) having no cards in a particular suit: his spades were void
noun
7.
an empty space or area: the huge desert voids of Asia
8.
a feeling or condition of loneliness or deprivation: his divorce left him in a void
9.
a lack of any cards in one suit: to have a void in spades
10.
Also called counter. the inside area of a character of type, such as the inside of an o
verb (mainly transitive)
11.
to make ineffective or invalid
12.
to empty (contents, etc) or make empty of contents
13.
(also intransitive) to discharge the contents of (the bowels or urinary bladder)
14.
(archaic) to vacate (a place, room, etc)
15.
(obsolete) to expel
Derived Forms
voider, noun
voidness, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French vuide, from Vulgar Latin vocītus (unattested), from Latin vacuus empty, from vacāre to be empty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for voided

void

adj.

late 13c., "unoccupied, vacant," from Anglo-French and Old French voide "empty, vast, wide, hollow, waste," from Latin vocivus "unoccupied, vacant," related to vacuus "empty" (see vacuum). Meaning "lacking or wanting" (something) is recorded from early 15c. Meaning "legally invalid" is attested from mid-15c.

n.

"empty space, vacuum," 1727; see void (adj.).

v.

"to clear" (some place, of something), c.1300, from void (adj.); meaning "to deprive (something) of legal validity" is attested from early 14c. Related: Voided; voiding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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voided in Medicine

void (void)
v. void·ed, void·ing, voids
To excrete body wastes. adj.
Containing no matter; empty.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Idioms and Phrases with voided

void

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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11
12
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