voracious

[vaw-rey-shuhs, voh-, vuh-]
adjective
1.
craving or consuming large quantities of food: a voracious appetite.
2.
exceedingly eager or avid: voracious readers; a voracious collector.

Origin:
1625–35; voraci(ty) + -ous

voraciously, adverb
voraciousness, noun
unvoracious, adjective
unvoraciously, adverb
unvoraciousness, noun

veracious, vociferous, voracious.


1. See ravenous. 2. rapacious, insatiable.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
voracious (vɒˈreɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  devouring or craving food in great quantities
2.  very eager or unremitting in some activity: voracious reading
 
[C17: from Latin vorāx swallowing greedily, from vorāre to devour]
 
vo'raciously
 
adv
 
voracity
 
n
 
vo'raciousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

voracious
1635, formed as an adj. form of voracity (1526), from M.Fr. voracité, from L. voracitatem (nom. voracitas) "greediness, ravenousness," from vorax (gen. voracis) "greedy," from vorare "to devour," from PIE base *gwer- "to swallow, devour" (cf. Skt. girati "he swallows," garah "drink;" Gk. bora
"food;" Lith. geriu "to drink;" O.C.S. ziro "to swallow," grulo "gullet").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
At the same time, every academic author is a voracious user of scholarly work.
Voracious, venomous lionfish are the first exotic species to invade coral reefs.
Though his days were consumed with farm work, he was a voracious reader.
They are voracious predators, feeding at night and generally staying close to
  the bottom.
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