waffle

2 [wof-uhl] Informal.
verb (used without object), waffled, waffling.
1.
to speak or write equivocally: to waffle on an important issue.
verb (used with object), waffled, waffling.
2.
to speak or write equivocally about: to waffle a campaign promise.
noun
3.
waffling language.

Origin:
1890–95; orig. dial. (Scots, N England): to wave about, flutter, waver, be hesitant; probably waff + -le

waffler, noun
wafflingly, adverb
waffly, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

waffle

3 [wof-uhl]
verb (used without object), waffled, waffling. British.
to talk foolishly or without purpose; idle away time talking.

Origin:
1695–1705; orig. dial. (N England); apparently waff to bark, yelp (imitative) + -le

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
waffle1 (ˈwɒfəl)
 
n
a.  a crisp golden-brown pancake with deep indentations on both sides
 b.  (as modifier): waffle iron
 
[C19: from Dutch wafel (earlier wæfel), of Germanic origin; related to Old High German wabo honeycomb]

waffle2 (ˈwɒfəl)
 
vb (often foll by on)
1.  to speak or write in a vague and wordy manner: he waffled on for hours
 
n
2.  vague and wordy speech or writing
 
[C19: of unknown origin]
 
'waffler2
 
n
 
'waffling2
 
adj, —n
 
'waffly2
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

waffle
1744, from Du. wafel "waffle," from M.Du. or M.L.G. wafel; cognate with O.H.G. waba "honeycomb" (Ger. Wabe) and related to O.H.G. weban, O.E. wefan "to weave" (see weave). Sense of "honeycomb" is preserved in some combinations referring to a weave of cloth. Waffle iron is from 1794.

waffle
1698, "to yelp, bark," frequentative of waff "to yelp" (1610); possibly of imitative origin. Figurative sense of "talk foolishly" (1701) led to that of "vacillate, equivocate" (1803), originally a Scottish and northern Eng. usage.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He's been kind of waffling, realizing that this could help him a lot so he
  didn't really come out against it this time.
No more sets made out of cereal boxes and aluminum foil, no more waffling
  monologues and congealed fancies.
His waffling around in his depositions speaks for itself.
Buck, however, is waffling on the personhood amendment.
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