waver

1 [wey-ver]
verb (used without object)
1.
to sway to and fro; flutter: Foliage wavers in the breeze.
2.
to flicker or quiver, as light: A distant beam wavered and then disappeared.
3.
become unsteady; begin to fail or give way: When she heard the news her courage wavered.
4.
to shake or tremble, as the hands or voice: Her voice wavered.
5.
to feel or show doubt, indecision, etc.; vacillate: He wavered in his determination.
6.
(of things) to fluctuate or vary: Prices wavered.
7.
to totter or reel: The earth quaked and the tower wavered.
noun
8.
an act of wavering, fluttering, or vacillating.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English (see wave, -er6); cognate with dialectal German wabern to move about, Old Norse vafra to toddle

waverer, noun
waveringly, adverb
nonwavering, adjective
unwavered, adjective
unwavering, adjective
unwaveringly, adverb


4. quiver. 5. Waver, fluctuate, vacillate refer to an alternation or hesitation between one direction and another. Waver means to hesitate between choices: to waver between two courses of action. Fluctuate suggests irregular change from one side to the other or up and down: The prices of stocks fluctuate when there is bad news followed by good. Vacillate is to make up one's mind and change it again suddenly; to be undecided as to what to do: We must not vacillate but must set a day.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

waver

2 [wey-ver]
noun
1.
a person who waves or causes something to wave: Election time brings out the wavers of flags and haranguers of mobs.
2.
a person who specializes in waving hair.
3.
something, as a curling iron, used for waving hair.

Origin:
1550–60; wave + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To waver
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World English Dictionary
waver (ˈweɪvə)
 
vb
1.  to be irresolute; hesitate between two possibilities
2.  to become unsteady
3.  to fluctuate or vary
4.  to move back and forth or one way and another
5.  (of light) to flicker or flash
 
n
6.  the act or an instance of wavering
 
[C14: from Old Norse vafra to flicker; related to German wabern to move about]
 
'waverer
 
n
 
'wavering
 
adj
 
'waveringly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

waver
c.1280, weyveren, "to show indecision," probably related to O.E. wæfre "restless, wavering," from P.Gmc. *wæbraz (cf. M.H.G. wabern "to waver," O.N. vafra "to hover about"), a frequentative form from the root of wave (v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Juarez did not waver in his public support for the stock.
Never impose a candidate on a department without its consent, and never waver
  from the principle of merit.
Hart also refuses to waver from his initial vision, and this has limited his
  scope.
But that's no excuse for allowing our attention to waver or letting boredom get
  the better of us at any stage of the process.
Slang
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