weary

[weer-ee]
adjective, wearier, weariest.
1.
physically or mentally exhausted by hard work, exertion, strain, etc.; fatigued; tired: weary eyes; a weary brain.
2.
characterized by or causing fatigue: a weary journey.
3.
impatient or dissatisfied with something (often followed by of ): weary of excuses.
4.
characterized by or causing impatience or dissatisfaction; tedious; irksome: a weary wait.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), wearied, wearying.
5.
to make or become weary; fatigue or tire: The long hours of work have wearied me.
6.
to make or grow impatient or dissatisfied with something or at having too much of something (often followed by of ): The long drive had wearied us of desert scenery. We had quickly wearied at such witless entertainment.

Origin:
before 900; (adj.) Middle English wery, Old English wērig; cognate with Old Saxon -wōrig; akin to Old English wōrian to crumble, break down, totter; (v.) Middle English werien, Old English wēr(i)gian, derivative of the adj.

wearily, adverb
weariness, noun
wearyingly, adverb
outweary, verb (used with object), outwearied, outwearying.
self-weariness, noun
self-weary, adjective
unweary, adjective
unwearying, adjective

wary, weary, leery.


1. spent. See tired1. 4. tiresome, wearisome. 5. exhaust. 6. irk; jade.


1. energetic. 4. interesting. 6. interest.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
weary (ˈwɪərɪ)
 
adj , -rier, -riest
1.  tired or exhausted
2.  causing fatigue or exhaustion
3.  caused by or suggestive of weariness: a weary laugh
4.  (postpositive; often foll by of or with) discontented or bored, esp by the long continuance of something
 
vb , -rier, -riest, -ries, -rying, -ried
5.  to make or become weary
6.  to make or become discontented or impatient, esp by the long continuance of something
 
[Old English wērig; related to Old Saxon wōrig, Old High German wuorag drunk, Greek hōrakian to faint]
 
'wearily
 
adv
 
'weariness
 
n
 
'wearying
 
adj
 
'wearyingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

weary
O.E. werig "tired," related to worian "to wander, totter," from W.Gmc. *worigaz (cf. O.S. worig "weary," O.H.G. wuorag "intoxicated"), of unknown origin. The verb is O.E. wergian (intr.), gewergian (trans.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Weariness from labor or exertion, nervous exhaustion, temporary loss of power
  to respond.
In addition to weariness, many of these seabirds appear to be suffering from
  pollution-related illnesses.
It's tempting to think of this bleakly nihilistic film as an expression of its
  creator's weariness with his own ideas.
Whatever weariness he felt at the crush of the public gaze, he was almost
  always willing to pause for the shot.
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