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[welsh-woo m-uh n, welch-] /ˈwɛlʃˌwʊm ən, ˈwɛltʃ-/
noun, plural Welshwomen.
a woman who is a native or inhabitant of Wales.
Origin of Welshwoman
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English Walsshwoman; see Welsh, woman Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for Welshwoman
Historical Examples
  • At this the little Welshwoman opened her eyes very wide and tried to speak, but she was so surprised she couldn't.

  • "The light one, the light one—the heavy one to come," crooned the Welshwoman.

    The Upper Berth Francis Marion Crawford
  • Somehow the Welshwoman had managed things for him, and all was well again.

    A Prince of Cornwall Charles W. Whistler
  • Mrs. Davis was a dear old Welshwoman, and a particular friend of Peggy's.

    A Terrible Tomboy Angela Brazil
  • There goes a Welshwoman's legacy to the sea, with a herd of swine with devils in them!'

  • She was a Welshwoman of the pure blood, therefore delicately mannered by nature.

  • This speaker was a Welshwoman; I recognised the clear, over-emphasised consonants, and a faint suggestion of an accent.

    The Great Return Arthur Machen
  • His lofty lady, although a Welshwoman bred and born, entertained a very different set of ideas on these subjects.

  • No gloomy Welshwoman shall people the dusky corners with weird horrors, nor utter horrid prophecies of death and ghastly things.

    The Upper Berth Francis Marion Crawford
  • “A Welshwoman married to a Scotch husband, possibly,” suggested Charlotte.

    The Shadow of Ashlydyat Mrs. Henry Wood

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