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welter1

[wel-ter] /ˈwɛl tər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to roll, toss, or heave, as waves or the sea.
2.
to roll, writhe, or tumble about; wallow, as animals (often followed by about):
pigs weltering about happily in the mud.
3.
to lie bathed in or be drenched in something, especially blood.
4.
to become deeply or extensively involved, associated, entangled, etc.:
to welter in setbacks, confusion, and despair.
noun
5.
a confused mass; a jumble or muddle:
a welter of anxious faces.
6.
a state of commotion, turmoil, or upheaval:
the welter that followed the surprise attack.
7.
a rolling, tossing, or tumbling about, as or as if by the sea, waves, or wind:
They found the shore through the mighty welter.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English, frequentative (see -er6) of welten to roll, Old English weltan; cognate with Middle Dutch welteren, Low German weltern to roll
Synonyms
6. confusion, tumult.

welter2

[wel-ter] /ˈwɛl tər/
noun
1.
Informal. a welterweight boxer or wrestler.
adjective
2.
(of a steeplechase or hurdle race) pertaining to, or noting a race in which the horses bear welterweights.
Origin
1785-95; welt + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for welter
  • The city's welter of signs is a crazy patchwork of human desires given material form.
  • The inevitable consequence will be a welter of bad loans.
  • They offered a welter of statistics to back their clashing positions.
  • One theory is that some write-offs have already been buried in the welter of losses taken during the crisis.
  • Their ideology, they say, long ago imploded in a welter of violence.
  • They routinely include a welter of written information superimposed on the picture.
  • The globe is a confusing welter of bans, advisories and alerts on some pork and some people.
  • Record companies rushed to record the groups, and there was a welter of copycats from the mainland.
  • So the idea of creating a single agency that would order the chaotic welter of tests arose naturally in testing circles.
  • The shift fueled a welter of coups and cults of personality.
British Dictionary definitions for welter

welter

/ˈwɛltə/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to roll about, writhe, or wallow
2.
(esp of the sea) to surge, heave, or toss
3.
to lie drenched in a liquid, esp blood
noun
4.
a rolling motion, as of the sea
5.
a confused mass; jumble
Word Origin
C13: from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch weltern; related to Old High German walzan, welzen to roll
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for welter
v.

"to roll or twist," c.1300, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German welteren "to roll," from Proto-Germanic *waltijanan (cf. Old English wieltan, Old Norse velta, Old High German walzan "to turn, revolve," German wälzen "to roll," Gothic waltjan "to roll"), from PIE root *wel- "to turn, revolve" (see volvox). The noun meaning "confused mass" is first recorded 1851.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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