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whelk1

[hwelk, welk] /ʰwɛlk, wɛlk/
noun
1.
any of several large, spiral-shelled, marine gastropods of the family Buccinidae, especially Buccinum undatum, that is used for food in Europe.
Origin of whelk1
900
before 900; late Middle English, aspirated variant of Middle English welk, Old English weoloc

whelk2

[hwelk, welk] /ʰwɛlk, wɛlk/
noun
1.
a pimple or pustule.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English whelke, Old English hwylca, hwelca; akin to wheal
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for whelk
Historical Examples
  • Like the whelk, he loves the bivalve mollusk, but does not bore for it.

    A Breeze from the Woods, 2nd Ed. William Chauncey Bartlett
  • The whelk and Periwinkle are gathered in immense numbers, and are used by us for food.

    On the Seashore R. Cadwallader Smith
  • The whelk had no idea how to teach any one, so the subject dropped.

    The Ravens and the Angels Elizabeth Rundle Charles
  • Our friend of the whelk stall was surveying the scene with intense disfavour.

    Men, Women and Guns H. C. (Herman Cyril) McNeile
  • Some of them would swallow the whelk shell, crab and all, but they would not eat one on which an Anemone was fixed.

    On the Seashore R. Cadwallader Smith
  • Now we will look at a shell-builder, the whelk, who uses his flinty tongue in quite another fashion.

    On the Seashore R. Cadwallader Smith
  • The whelk shell (Fig. 482) appears in the arms of Storey and Wilkinson.

    A Complete Guide to Heraldry Arthur Charles Fox-Davies
  • The whelk, however, is a clever burglar; he knows how to make a way into the hardest of shelly houses.

    On the Seashore R. Cadwallader Smith
  • A genus of mollusks with light horn colored shells, and inhabiting the cold waters of the Arctic seas, is the Buccinum, or whelk.

  • The whelk and his cousins know how to bore a hole in the shell, and suck out the helpless Oyster.

    On the Seashore R. Cadwallader Smith
British Dictionary definitions for whelk

whelk1

/wɛlk/
noun
1.
any carnivorous marine gastropod mollusc of the family Buccinidae, of coastal waters and intertidal regions, having a strong snail-like shell
Word Origin
Old English weoloc; related to Middle Dutch willok, Old Norse vil entrails

whelk2

/wɛlk/
noun
1.
a raised lesion on the skin; wheal
Derived Forms
whelky, adjective
Word Origin
Old English hwylca, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for whelk
n.

large marine snail, Old English weoloc, wioloc, from Proto-Germanic *weluka- (cf. Middle Dutch willoc, Dutch wulk), perhaps from PIE root *wel- "to turn, revolve" (see volvox; cf. also volute). The spelling with wh- dates from 15c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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whelk in Medicine

whelk (wělk)
n.
An inflamed swelling, such as a pimple or pustule.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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15
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