whist

1 [hwist, wist]
noun
a card game, an early form of bridge, but without bidding.

Origin:
1655–65; earlier whisk, perhaps identical with whisk, though sense relationship uncertain

Dictionary.com Unabridged

whist

2 [hwist, wist]
interjection
1.
hush! silence! be still!
adjective
2.
hushed; silent; still.
noun
3.
Chiefly Irish. silence: Hold your whist.
verb (used without object)
4.
British Dialect. to be or become silent.
verb (used with object)
5.
British Dialect. to silence.
Also, whisht.


Origin:
1350–1400, Middle English; imitative

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
whisht or (Scot) whist (hwiʃt, hwist)
 
interj
1.  hush! be quiet!
 
adj
2.  silent or still
 
vb
3.  to make or become silent
 
[C14: compare hist; also obsolete v. whist to become silent]
 
whist or (Scot) whist
 
interj
 
adj
 
vb
 
[C14: compare hist; also obsolete v. whist to become silent]

whist1 (wɪst)
 
n
a card game for four in which the two sides try to win the balance of the 13 tricks: forerunner of bridge
 
[C17: perhaps changed from whisk, referring to the sweeping up or whisking up of the tricks]

whist2 (hwist)
 
interj, —adj, —vb
a variant of whisht

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

whist
card game, 1663, alteration of whisk "kind of card game," alluded to as early as 1529, perhaps so called from the notion of "whisking" up cards after each trick; altered perhaps from assumption that it was an interjection invoking silence, from whist "silent" (M.E.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The loser of a hand at whist sometimes tells what he would have done if he had only had another trump.
He had not been asked to join the tennis club or the whist club.
They had solemn rubbers of whist, when they went upstairs after drinking, and their carriages were called at half-past ten.
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