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wiggle

[wig-uh l] /ˈwɪg əl/
verb (used without object), wiggled, wiggling.
1.
to move or go with short, quick, irregular movements from side to side:
The puppies wiggled with delight.
verb (used with object), wiggled, wiggling.
2.
to cause to wiggle; move quickly and irregularly from side to side.
noun
3.
a wiggling movement or course.
4.
a wiggly line.
5.
a dish of creamed fish or shellfish and peas.
Idioms
6.
get a wiggle on, Informal. to hurry up; get a move on:
If you don't get a wiggle on, we'll miss the first act.
Origin of wiggle
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English wiglen; akin to Old English wegan to move, wēg motion, wicga insect; compare Norwegian vigla to totter, frequentative of vigga to rock oneself, Dutch, Low German wiggelen
Related forms
outwiggle, verb (used with object), outwiggled, outwiggling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for wiggle
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The first time the siren had been fitted Bones had taken the wiggle through "the Channel."

  • wiggle appeared to claim the locust as a souvenir of the scout's magic.

    Pee-wee Harris Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  • Sometimes he allowed Wink or wiggle to steer and they felt very proud indeed.

    Grand-Daddy Whiskers, M.D. Nellie M. Leonard
  • To my mind, she'd sooner be slapped in the face by us than have us try an' wiggle out of the deal.

    Rimrock Trail J. Allan Dunn
  • wiggle doing this as everything else, with erratic impulse, drinking a dozen times and not much at any time.

    Pee-wee Harris Percy Keese Fitzhugh
British Dictionary definitions for wiggle

wiggle

/ˈwɪɡəl/
verb
1.
to move or cause to move with jerky movements, esp from side to side
noun
2.
the act or an instance of wiggling
3.
(slang, mainly US) get a wiggle on, to hurry up
Derived Forms
wiggler, noun
wiggly, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch wiggelen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wiggle
v.

early 13c., perhaps from Middle Dutch or Middle Flemish wigelen, frequentative of wiegen "to rock," from wiege "cradle" (cf. Old High German wiga, German Wiege, Old Frisian widze), from PIE root *wegh- "to move" (see weigh). Related: Wiggled; wiggling. The noun is attested from 1816.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for wiggle

wigger

noun

A white person, esp a teenager, who imitates the style and behavior of inner-city blacks: When I was wearing my permanent-press Lees with matching Adidas sneakers, kids I went to school with were calling me a wigger

[1990s+; apparently a shortening of white nigger; perhaps influenced by wigger, ''a very crazy person,'' fr jazz talk]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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11
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