windage

[win-dij]
noun
1.
the influence of the wind in deflecting a missile.
2.
the amount of such deflection.
3.
the degree to which a gunsight must be adjusted to correct for windage.
4.
a difference between the diameter of a projectile and that of the gun bore, for the escape of gas and the prevention of friction.
5.
Nautical. that portion of a vessel's surface upon which the wind acts.
6.
Machinery. friction between a rotor and the air within its casing, as in an electric generator.
7.
Electricity. the resisting influence of air against the rotating armature of a dynamo, creating a power loss.

Origin:
1700–10; wind1 + -age

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
windage (ˈwɪndɪdʒ)
 
n
1.  a.  a deflection of a projectile as a result of the effect of the wind
 b.  the degree of such deflection
 c.  the extent to which it is necessary to adjust the wind gauge of a gun sight in order to compensate for such deflection
2.  the difference between a firearm's bore and the diameter of its projectile
3.  nautical the exposed part of the hull of a vessel responsible for wind resistance
4.  the retarding force upon a rotating machine resulting from the drag of the air

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Example sentences
But there's a lot of uncertainty in how much to factor windage into an equation.
The tower top weight, size and windage is minimum, hence cost is much reduced.
The laser shall have windage and elevation boresight adjustments.
The diagonal windage rods and riser column rods are tightly secured and
  straight with no metal loss observed.
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