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Denotation vs. Connotation

windbreak

[wind-breyk] /ˈwɪndˌbreɪk/
noun
1.
a growth of trees, a structure of boards, or the like, serving as a shelter from the wind.
Origin of windbreak
1765-1775
1765-75; wind1 + break
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for windbreak
Historical Examples
  • I believe a windbreak is essential, and would make it of Osage orange, maple, or cottonwood.

    The Apple Various
  • I believe a windbreak of box-elder or evergreens is beneficial but not essential.

    The Apple Various
  • Near Fargo we found some extra good specimens of Norway spruce, which I consider the best of all windbreak makers.

  • While I would not object to a windbreak on the south side, I do not think it necessary.

    The Apple Various
  • It could, however, be recommended as an integral part of a windbreak, or woodlot where the land owner has an apiary.

    Trees of Indiana Charles Clemon Deam
  • It is, perhaps, unnecessary to mention the value of a windbreak to a farm.

  • I think a windbreak of several rows of Osage orange on the south side is a necessity.

    The Apple Various
  • I tell you location has more to do with it than a windbreak in such a case.

  • A windbreak of heavy tree growth is desirable but never get near trees that may blow down in a storm.

    Touring Afoot Claude Powell Fordyce
  • The snow would surely come from that direction, and having a windbreak might mean considerable.

    Storm-Bound Alan Douglas
British Dictionary definitions for windbreak

windbreak

/ˈwɪndˌbreɪk/
noun
1.
a fence, line of trees, etc, serving as a protection from the wind by breaking its force
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for windbreak
n.

also wind-break, "row of trees, etc., to break the force of the wind," 1861, American English, from wind (n.1) + break (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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19
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