wolds

wold

1 [wohld]
noun
1.
an elevated tract of open country.
2.
Often, wolds. an open, hilly district, especially in England, as in Yorkshire or Lincolnshire.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English w(e)ald forest; cognate with German Wald; akin to wild, Old Norse vǫllr plain

Dictionary.com Unabridged

wold

2 [wohld]
noun
weld2.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wold1 (wəʊld)
 
n
literary chiefly a tract of open rolling country, esp upland
 
[Old English weald bush; related to Old Saxon wald, German Wald forest, Old Norse vollr ground; see wild]

wold2 (wəʊld)
 
n
another name for weld

Wolds (wəʊldz)
 
pl n
the Wolds a range of chalk hills in NE England: consists of the Yorkshire Wolds to the north, separated from the Lincolnshire Wolds by the Humber estuary

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wold
O.E. wald (Anglian), weald (W.Saxon) "forest, wooded upland," from P.Gmc. *walthuz (cf. O.S., O.Fris. wald, M.Du. wold, Du. woud, O.H.G. wald, Ger. Wald "forest," Swed. vall "pasture," O.N. völlr "soil, field, meadow"); perhaps connected to wild. The sense development
from "forested upland" to "rolling open country" (c.1200) perhaps is from Scandinavian influence, or a testimony to the historical deforestation of Britain. Not current since mid-16c.; survives mainly in place names (cf. Cotswold).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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