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wrath

[rath, rahth or, esp. British, rawth] /ræθ, rɑθ or, esp. British, rɔθ/
noun
1.
strong, stern, or fierce anger; deeply resentful indignation; ire.
2.
vengeance or punishment as the consequence of anger.
adjective
3.
Archaic. wroth.
Origin
900
before 900; (noun) Middle English wraththe, Old English wrǣththo, equivalent to wrāth wroth + -tho -th1; (adj.) variant of wroth by association with the noun
Synonyms
1. rage, resentment, fury, choler.

Wrath

[rath] /ræθ/
noun
1.
Cape, a high promontory in NW Scotland: most NW point on mainland.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wrath
  • Nevertheless, for killing a highly respected president, the eight conspirators charged encountered the wrath of a nation.
  • When you seek wrath, you become a link in the chain of wrath as wrath begets wrath.
  • But, unless you're a genuine sociopath, it's a real feat to derive such pleasure from actually being the subject of others' wrath.
  • Some learn to hide it as a way of winning parents' approval or avoiding the wrath of their peers.
  • No one seems to have told him that there is a simple way to avoid the wrath of bond markets: balance your books and don't borrow.
  • He must keep the city moving throughout the winter, or face the wrath of the locals.
  • Anti-government journalists continue to be sacked by media bosses fearful of incurring the prime minister's wrath.
  • The sugar industry has lost money for decades, but politicians have kept it going rather than risk the wrath of the electorate.
  • For now, the fight remains popular, both with wealthy farmers and with peasants who fear the guerrillas' wrath.
  • The police are also lying low, apparently afraid of the locals' wrath.
British Dictionary definitions for wrath

wrath

/rɒθ/
noun
1.
angry, violent, or stern indignation
2.
divine vengeance or retribution
3.
(archaic) a fit of anger or an act resulting from anger
adjective
4.
(obsolete) incensed; angry
Derived Forms
wrathless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English wrǣththu; see wroth

Wrath

/rɒθ; rɔːθ/
noun
1.
Cape Wrath, a promontory at the NW extremity of the Scottish mainland
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wrath
n.

Old English wræððu "anger," from wrað "angry" (see wroth) + -þu, from Proto-Germanic -itho (as in strength, width etc.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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