wrier

wrier

[rahy-er]
adjective
comparative of wry.
Relevant Questions
Dictionary.com Unabridged

wry

[rahy]
adjective, wrier, wriest.
1.
produced by a distortion or lopsidedness of the facial features: a wry grin.
2.
abnormally bent or turned to one side; twisted; crooked: a wry mouth.
3.
devious in course or purpose; misdirected.
4.
contrary; perverse.
5.
distorted or perverted, as in meaning.
6.
bitterly or disdainfully ironic or amusing: a wry remark.

Origin:
1515–25; adj. use of wry to twist, Middle English wryen, Old English wrīgian to go, strive, tend, swerve; cognate with Dutch wrijgen to twist; akin to Old English wrigels, Latin rīcula veil, Greek rhoikós crooked

wryly, adverb
wryness, noun


2. awry, askew.


2. straight.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wrier or wryer (ˈraɪə)
 
adj
the comparative of wry
 
wryer or wryer
 
adj

wry (raɪ)
 
adj , wrier, wriest, wryer, wryest
1.  twisted, contorted, or askew
2.  (of a facial expression) produced or characterized by contorting of the features, usually indicating dislike
3.  drily humorous; sardonic
4.  warped, misdirected, or perverse
5.  (of words, thoughts, etc) unsuitable or wrong
 
vb , wrier, wriest, wryer, wryest, wries, wrying, wried
6.  (tr) to twist or contort
 
[C16: from dialect wry to twist, from Old English wrīgian to turn; related to Old Frisian wrīgia to bend, Old Norse riga to move, Middle Low German wrīch bent, stubborn]
 
'wryly
 
adv
 
'wryness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wry
1520s, "distorted, somewhat twisted," from obs. verb wry "to contort, to twist or turn," from O.E. wrigian "to turn, bend, move, go," from P.Gmc. *wrig- (cf. O.Fris. wrigia "to bend," M.L.G. wrich "turned, twisted"), from PIE *wreik- "to turn" (cf. Gk. rhoikos "crooked," Lith. raisas "paralysed"), from
base *wer- "to turn, bend" (see versus). Of words, thoughts, etc., from 1599. The original sense is preserved in awry.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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