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wrinkle1

[ring-kuh l] /ˈrɪŋ kəl/
noun
1.
a small furrow or crease in the skin, especially of the face, as from aging or frowning.
2.
a temporary slight ridge or furrow on a surface, due to contraction, folding, crushing, or the like.
verb (used with object), wrinkled, wrinkling.
3.
to form wrinkles in; corrugate; crease:
Don't wrinkle your dress.
verb (used without object), wrinkled, wrinkling.
4.
to become wrinkled.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English (noun), back formation from wrinkled, Old English gewrinclod, past participle of gewrinclian to wind round; perhaps akin to wrick, wrench

wrinkle2

[ring-kuh l] /ˈrɪŋ kəl/
noun, Informal.
1.
an ingenious trick or device; a clever innovation:
a new advertising wrinkle.
Origin
1375-1425; late Middle English, equivalent to wrinc trick (Old English wrenc; see wrench) + -le
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wrinkles
  • When the flower is aligned to your liking, press it firmly to secure it and remove any wrinkles or air pockets.
  • The suicide theory is plainly less complicated and more believable than the spy theory, but it does have wrinkles of its own.
  • The only thing that time per se produces is: wrinkles, arid bones and ruins.
  • UV-induced tan was also, unfortunately, the cause of a sharp rise in skin cancer rates and premature wrinkles.
  • The smallest dunes show up as wrinkles alongside larger dunes.
  • The injected biochemical agent removes wrinkles by temporarily freezing the underlying expressive muscles.
  • When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.
  • Her wrinkles, the way she smoked her cigar and the flower easily caught my eye.
  • The many wrinkles in his skin stand for all the knowledge he's seen through his eyes.
  • Smooth the pieces with your hands to eliminate wrinkles.
British Dictionary definitions for wrinkles

wrinkle1

/ˈrɪŋkəl/
noun
1.
a slight ridge in the smoothness of a surface, such as a crease in the skin as a result of age
verb
2.
to make or become wrinkled, as by crumpling, creasing, or puckering
Derived Forms
wrinkleless, adjective
wrinkly, adjective
Word Origin
C15: back formation from wrinkled, from Old English gewrinclod, past participle of wrinclian to wind around; related to Swedish vrinka to sprain, Lithuanian reñgti to twist. See wrench

wrinkle2

/ˈrɪŋkəl/
noun
1.
(informal) a clever or useful trick, hint, or dodge
Word Origin
Old English wrenc trick; related to Middle Low German wrank struggle, Middle High German ranc sudden turn. See wrench
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wrinkles

wrinkle

v.

c.1400 (implied in wrinkling), probably from stem of Old English gewrinclod "wrinkled, crooked, winding," past participle of gewrinclian "to wind, crease," from perfective prefix ge- + -wrinclian "to wind," from Proto-Germanic *wrankjan (see wrench (v.)). Related: Wrinkled.

n.

"fold or crease in the extenal body," late 14c.; in cloth or clothing from early 15c., probably from wrinkle (v.). Meaning "defect, problem" first recorded 1640s; that of "idea, device, notion" (especially a new one) is from 1817.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for wrinkles

wrinkle

noun
  1. An idea, device, trick, notion, style, etc, esp anewone: Wearing that thing sideways is a nice wrinkle (1817+)
  2. A defect or problem, esp a minor one; bug: The plan's still got a few wrinkles, nothing we can't handle (1643+)

[origin of first sense unknown; perhaps fr the same semantic impulse as twist in a similar sense, referring to a quick shift in course; perhaps a reference to a lack of plain simplicity in dress or decoration, and the prevalence of stylish pleats, folds, etc, since the earliest form is without all wrinkles; second sense fr the notion of ironing the wrinkles out of something]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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